Saurer Aaron - Saurer, Aaron

Aaron Saurer

Biography

Cooking professionally wasn’t always my goal early in life, but it certainly was my passion. Growing up in Louisville, Kentucky, my uncle owned 3 prominent restaurants. During high school, I spent a majority of my nights working in a restaurant, learning everything from dining room to kitchen. After a year of engineering school, I quickly came to realize that cooking was my true passion. I returned to Louisville not long after, helping to open a new restaurant with my uncle at age 20. Decided to attend culinary arts school nearby while also working full time.... READ MORE

Cooking professionally wasn’t always my goal early in life, but it certainly was my passion. Growing up in Louisville, Kentucky, my uncle owned 3 prominent restaurants. During high school, I spent a majority of my nights working in a restaurant, learning everything from dining room to kitchen. After a year of engineering school, I quickly came to realize that cooking was my true passion. I returned to Louisville not long after, helping to open a new restaurant with my uncle at age 20. Decided to attend culinary arts school nearby while also working full time. Four years later in 2011, made the move to New York to further my career in one of the best food cities in the world. I met my business partner James on the first day I moved to NY and we have been friends ever since. We were both on the opening team of Daniel Humm’s The NoMad, a one Michelin star and three star NY Times restaurant. This is where our collaboration got its birth, first on staff meal ideas and then on business ideas. After two and a half years of Michelin kitchen experience, James and I created Carnal as a stepping stone to a full scale restaurant that showcases our creativity and technical skill. Carnal implies food that appeals to our instinctual pleasures as humans. We have the skills and standards found in fine dining restaurants but wish to apply them to a more personal experience, with emphasis on slow cooking processes, charcoal, smoke and whole animal/vegetable utilization.

READ LESS
What is your favorite NYC restaurant? And what is your go-to dish? Uncle Boon’s. The Mee Krob dish is a must. Its beef sweetbreads with crispy noodle salad, peanuts, & herbs. What is your ultimate meal? To be able to sit in an Italian grandmothers house for a meal of fresh pasta. What three things are always in your pantry? Maldon sea salt, shallots, & bay leaves. If you weren't a chef, what would you be? To be honest, I wouldn’t want to be doing anything else. But, I always wanted to be like my grandfather and be a Navy pilot. If you could cook with anyone, who would that be? David Kinch of Manresa. His cooking style and personality have always been something I’ve looked up to. What’s your favorite NYCWFF memory? Looking for this to become my new favorite memory. Can’t wait to introduce Carnal to everyone.

Recipe Name:
Foraged Mushrooms with Smoked Beef fat and Farro

Recipe Ingredients:

King oyster mushrooms
Maitake mushrooms
Baby enoki muchrooms
Chicken stock
Mushroom stock
Brunoise Shallots
Farro
Kosher Salt
Tarragon
Smoked Beef fat
Mushroom Sabayon:
250g melted butter
200g smoked beef fat
5 eggs
2 egg yolks
150g reduced mushroom stock
60g fresh lemon juice
18g salt

Recipe Instructions:
Combine all ingredients for sabayon in a stainless steel isi canister and charge with 2 N2O charges. Cook at 62°C for 30 minutes. Keep in a warm place until plating.
Sweat the shallots in the beef fat until tender and then add the farro. Toast the farro for 1 minute before adding a few ladles of hot chicken and mushroom stock combined. Cook the farro just like risotto, adding enough stock to cover the grain and allowing it to absorb before adding more. Make sure to constantly stir the farro to ensure even cooking. Cook until tender, season with kosher salt and fresh tarragon. Keep warm with a lid.
Over a wood fire, grill the mushrooms that have been seasoned with smoked beef fat and salt.
Have fun with the plating style, but the dish is best enjoyed with plenty of sabayon, herbs, and mushrooms. It’s better once everything is mixed up.