Lathan Adam - Lathan, Adam

Adam Lathan

Biography

Adam Lathan is a founding partner and the Executive Chef of The Gumbo Bros in Brooklyn, NY.

Adam was born and raised in Mobile, Alabama and started cooking at a young age. Adam learned traditional cooking methods and technique from his family using fresh seafood, produce and game from the Gulf Coast.

Founding The Gumbo Bros as a small catering/pop up food vendor in 2014, Adam’s cooking has gone on to receive high praise from customers and press alike having been seen/featured in: The New York Times, Eater, Martha Stewart Living, Gothamist, NY Magazine and... READ MORE

Adam Lathan is a founding partner and the Executive Chef of The Gumbo Bros in Brooklyn, NY.

Adam was born and raised in Mobile, Alabama and started cooking at a young age. Adam learned traditional cooking methods and technique from his family using fresh seafood, produce and game from the Gulf Coast.

Founding The Gumbo Bros as a small catering/pop up food vendor in 2014, Adam’s cooking has gone on to receive high praise from customers and press alike having been seen/featured in: The New York Times, Eater, Martha Stewart Living, Gothamist, NY Magazine and the Wall Street Journal.

The Gumbo Bros have recently expanded and opened their first restaurant in the Boerum Hill Neighborhood of Brooklyn where they specialize in gumbo, po boys and all types of cajun & creole classics.

Adam is a graduate of Louisiana State University and the International Culinary Center (formerly the French Culinary institute). Adam is an active alum of ICC’s culinary entrepreneurship program and serves as a mentor to aspiring restaurateurs at the school.

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What is your favorite NYC restaurant? And what is your go-to dish? Pearl Oyster Bar in the Village. Their lobster roll is my favorite in the city.What is your ultimate meal? Fried Chicken, rice & gravy, broccoli casseroleWhat three things are always in your pantry? Crystal Hot Sauce, Fresh Honey, Homemade GranolaIf you weren't a chef, what would you be? I would probably go into teaching.If you could cook with anyone, who would that be? Emeril Lagasse. I grew up watching Emeril Live and learned a lot from his shows/cook books.What’s your favorite NYCWFF memory? 2016 was my first NYCWFF and it meant a lot to my team and I to be selected! My family flew up from Alabama and had an absolute blast. It was a great night!

Chicken & Dumplings

 

Ingredients:

Broth:

1 whole chicken, broken down (about 3lbs)
2.5 quarts chicken stock
1 medium white onion (chopped)
2 carrots (peeled and chopped)
3 stalks of celery (chopped)
4 tablespoons butter
1 garlic clove (minced)
2 bay leafs
3 sprigs of fresh thyme
¼ cup heavy cream or whole milk
1 Teaspoon Cajun seasoning
Small Pinch of Cayenne pepper
Salt & Black Pepper
AP Flour

Dumplings:
1 cup buttermilk
1 teaspoon salt
2 cups AP flour

 

Directions:

For the Broth:

Coat chicken in salt, pepper, Cajun seasoning and then dredge in flour
Melt butter in 5 quart Dutch oven over medium high heat; add chicken pieces and brown well on all sides… Once cooked through, set aside to cool

Add onion, celery, carrots, garlic, salt, pepper, bay leafs and a few sprigs of fresh thyme. Cook until the onions are translucent (4-5 minutes).

Add 3 tablespoons of flour to make a roux. Stir the flour into the vegetable mixture for 3-4 minutes to cook off any raw flour taste.

Add broth and bring to a simmer and remove the thyme and bay leafs.

Debone and shred the cooled chicken meat and add it back to the pot, let it all simmer together for 20-30 minutes while you prep your dumplings

Slowly stir in the dumplings into your simmering mixture, making sure to separate them by gently stirring with a wooden spoon.

Add cream and simmer the dumplings for 6-7 minutes before killing the heat.

Taste and add salt, pepper and cayenne to your liking.

Serve and enjoy!

For the Buttermilk Dumplings:
In a large mixing bowl add your flour and salt

Slowly mix in buttermilk, kneading with your hands to form a solid ball.

Take the ball and roll it out on a clean surface dusted with flour until about ¼: thick.

Take a pizza cutter (or a knife) and cut the dough into 1-inch squares.

Make sure that the squares are separated and have enough flour on them so that they will not stick together and make one large dumpling.