Lin Lien - Lin, Lien

Lien Lin

Biography

Lien Lin was born in Hong Kong as a refugee from Mong Cai, Vietnam. She was sponsored to the USA along with her family in the early 1980’s. After studying at University of Southern California she attended The California Culinary Academy in San Francisco. In 2002 she joined The Slanted Door team. Working there for over ten years, advancing from line cook to Executive Sous Chef at the Slanted Door Group.

In 2011, Lien joined forces with Jane Lin and launched Mama Tong; a producer of Chinese healing soups packaged for retail consumption. In February... READ MORE

Lien Lin was born in Hong Kong as a refugee from Mong Cai, Vietnam. She was sponsored to the USA along with her family in the early 1980’s. After studying at University of Southern California she attended The California Culinary Academy in San Francisco. In 2002 she joined The Slanted Door team. Working there for over ten years, advancing from line cook to Executive Sous Chef at the Slanted Door Group.

In 2011, Lien joined forces with Jane Lin and launched Mama Tong; a producer of Chinese healing soups packaged for retail consumption. In February 2015 she opened Bricolage, a modern Vietnamese gastro pub in Brooklyn. She is the Chef and works alongside her business partner and husband, Edward Lin.

Lien is a founding member of Asian Food Mafia founded in 2016. She also sits on the Advisory Board of the Asian Culinary Forum since 2009, Sprouts Cooking Club since 2017 and Emma’s Torch since 2018.

Lien and Edward reside in Brooklyn, running the restaurant and raising two boys, Jaxon (7 years old), Elliott (1 year old.)

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What is your favorite NYC restaurant? And what is your go-to dish? Hakata Tonton. Hakata Motsu (beef intestine) hot pot. What is your ultimate meal? My parent's holiday dinner party. 2 turkey, 1 roast beef, 1 pork loin, 100 banh cuon dumplings, 8 racks spareribs, 1 pot of congee and all the fixings and sides. What three things are always in your pantry? Fish sauce, sesame oil, packets of instant ramen. If you weren't a chef, what would you be? I've been told I should be a stand-up comedian. If you could cook with anyone, who would that be? My parents. They are my heroes!

Recipe name:

Kao Yuk, braised pork belly

Recipe Ingredients:
5 lb slab skin-on pork belly
3 tbsp honey
1/2 cup Tianjiang Preserved Vegetable, rinsed
2 tbsp rice cooking wine
1/2 tbsp 5 spice powder
1 tbsp sugar
1 tsp white pepper, ground
1 tsp galangal powder
1/3 cup garlic cloves, peeled
1/2 Kikkoman soy sauce
1/4 cup dark soy
1/2 each preserved lemon, seeds removed
6 cubes red fermented bean curd
Recipe Instructions:
Bring a pot of water to a boil.
Cut pork belly into large slabs about 3″ wide and 6″-8″ in length. Place pork belly boiling water and simmer for 8 minutes. Pull out the pork belly and pierce the skin with a meat tenderizer. Then rub the skin with honey.
Deep fry the pork slabs in oil at 350 degrees F. Carefully place the pork belly skin side down in the oil. Be careful because oil will splatter. Cover with a lid. Fry until the skin is deep golden brown. Remove from oil and soak in cold water to make the skin soft.
Slice pork belly, against the grain into 1/2″ thick pieces.
While you have the fryer oil out. Deep fry the diced potato at 300 degrees F. until tender, about 3-5 minutes. Cool and drain on paper towel. Set aside.
In a food processor combine preserved vegetable, cooking wine, 5-spice powder, sugar, white pepper, galangal powered, garlic, Kikkoman, dark soy, preserved lemon, red fermented bean curd. Process until well combined. Pour marinade over the sliced pieces of pork belly and mix well.
Arrange pieces of marinated pork belly in dish for steaming. Steam pork belly over high heat for 2 hours. Check on water level every 1/2 hour. Add hot water for steaming as needed.
Enjoy over steamed rice, in a sandwich or dice up potato and make a hash!