Karr Nicole - Karr, Nicole

Nicole Karr

Biography

Nicole Karr is a professional Chef and native New Yorker. She has worked in restaurants in Italy, Maine and all around New York City. If it involves food, Nicole has done it. Her career has taken her from teaching cooking classes to private chef work and food styling for top brands.
Growing up in an Italian family, all Nicole can remember doing was cooking and eating. She was immersed in a culture where food brought family together and kept them close. For her, Italian food is comfort food. It’s fresh pasta & rustic dishes;... READ MORE

Nicole Karr is a professional Chef and native New Yorker. She has worked in restaurants in Italy, Maine and all around New York City. If it involves food, Nicole has done it. Her career has taken her from teaching cooking classes to private chef work and food styling for top brands.
Growing up in an Italian family, all Nicole can remember doing was cooking and eating. She was immersed in a culture where food brought family together and kept them close. For her, Italian food is comfort food. It’s fresh pasta & rustic dishes; seasonal, classic, and beautiful in all its simplicity. While working in Italy, Nicole fell in love with the beautiful and intimate process of pasta, from making the dough to shaping it in her hands. Her cooking style is nostalgic, and reminiscent of her Aunt Lucille’s cucumber salad and Grandma Rosie’s Pasta, using flavorful ingredients and a simple preparation. Ingredients and techniques of authentic Italian cuisine are not only basic principles, but a way of life.

She is the author of “Handmade Pasta: Workshop & Cookbook” and the Chef de Cuisine of Vinegar Hill House in Brooklyn, New York.

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What is your favorite NYC restaurant? And what is your go-to dish? My favorite restaurant in NYC is Lilia and I always order the Rigatoni Diavola.What is your ultimate meal? My ultimate meal is definitely my mom's sunday sauce, pasta and her meatballs.What three things are always in your pantry? Good olive oil,If you weren't a chef, what would you be? There is nothing else I could ever imagine myself doing.If you could cook with anyone, who would that be? I would love to cook with Marc Vetri.What’s your favorite NYCWFF memory? I have never been to the NYCWFF and I hope to create memories this year when I attend.

Black Pepper Trofie with Clams, Fennel and Sausage

 

Ingredients:

Black pepper trofie Pasta
Semolina Dough
1 cup (168 g) semolina flour
1 cup (127 g) 00 flour
1 tbsp (10 g) kosher salt
1 tbsp (10g) freshly ground black pepper
3⁄4 cup (178 ml) warm water

2 tbsp (12 g) freshly ground black pepper
To finish
Olive oil
1 bulb fennel, halved, thinly sliced
3 garlic cloves, chopped
1 shallot, sliced
8 oz (227 g) sweet Italian sausage, removed from casing
4 lb (1.8 kg) littleneck clams 1 lemon, juice and zest
1 cup (237 ml) white wine
1⁄4 cup (58 g) unsalted butter Kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper

 

Directions:

Dust two sheet pans with semolina flour.

To make the Semolina Dough, combine the flours, salt, pepper and place on
a dry work surface. Form a mound about 10 inches (25 cm) in diameter. Using your hands, create a well in the middle of the flour-and-salt mixture. Slowly pour the water into the middle and gradually work the flour in using your fingers or a fork. Combine the flour and water until it all is fully incorporated. If the dough is sticking to your work surface, add a little bit of flour. If the dough feels dry, spray a little bit of water to bind it together.

Once the dough is formed into a ball, begin to knead it by pushing down with the heel of your hand and rotating it. Knead the dough for about
10 minutes. The dough has had sufficient kneading when it has a smooth appearance and springs back when you press it.

Wrap the dough tightly with plastic wrap and let it rest for at least
30 minutes at room temperature before using. If you are not using the dough right away, refrigerate it.

To make the trofie, cut off a small piece of black pepper dough and cover the rest of the dough with plastic wrap. With your hands, roll the piece of dough into a rope about 1⁄4-inch (6-mm) thick. Cut 1⁄2-inch (12-mm) pieces of dough from the rope. With your hands, one at a time, roll the pieces into ropes about 1⁄8-inch (3-mm) thick and 3 inches (7.6 cm) long. Using the side of your hand or a bench scraper positioned at an angle to the dough, push down firmly on the edge and drag toward your body. This will give the trofie its spiral shape. Place the trofie on the semolina-dusted sheet pans and leave it uncovered until ready to cook.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.

To steam the clams, in a pot over high heat, add a drizzle of olive oil, fennel, garlic and shallot.

 

Cook for about 2 minutes or until soft. Add the sausage, breaking it up in the pot. Cook until golden brown. Then add the clams, lemon juice, zest, white wine, butter, salt and freshly ground pepper. Cover and cook until the clams open, about 5 to 7 minutes.

In the meantime, drop the trofie in the boiling water and cook until al dente, about 1 to 3 minutes. Add the pasta to the pot with the mussels and stir to combine.
To serve, divide the pasta and clams between bowls.