Patinkin-Erin

Erin Patinkin

Biography

Erin Patinkin is CEO and co-founder of Ovenly, which she launched in 2010 after spending over a decade in nonprofit organizations. After delivering her first currant-rosemary scone, Erin quickly traded in her business casual for kitchen clogs and an apron. Since then, Erin has grown Ovenly into a “fiendishly beloved” bakery named as one of New York’s best and as some of the best pastries in the country. Erin has been recognized as one of the most “badass women” in food by Zagat and Thrillist and as “one to watch” by Conde Nast, among... READ MORE

Erin Patinkin is CEO and co-founder of Ovenly, which she launched in 2010 after spending over a decade in nonprofit organizations. After delivering her first currant-rosemary scone, Erin quickly traded in her business casual for kitchen clogs and an apron. Since then, Erin has grown Ovenly into a “fiendishly beloved” bakery named as one of New York’s best and as some of the best pastries in the country. Erin has been recognized as one of the most “badass women” in food by Zagat and Thrillist and as “one to watch” by Conde Nast, among other accolades. Erin speaks about her work at national events, and her writing has been featured in Lucky Peach, Vice, Cherry Bombe, and in her cookbook, Ovenly: Sweet & Salty Treats from New York’s Most Creative Bakery, named as one of the best books of 2014 by NPR. She has appeared in on Good Morning America, The Chew, Unique Sweets, and in Eater, Bon Appetit, Inc, Food & Wine, The New York Times. Now, Erin has dedicated her leadership and business practice to “radical responsibility” and to the creation of a more empathetic economy through open hiring practices, quality job creation, and environmental impact reduction.

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What is your favorite NYC restaurant? And what is your go-to dish? Right now, it's Cervo's. The restaurant makes everything I want to eat. Since it's seasonally driven, I don't have a go-to dish but I do love the shrimp sandwich currently on the menu.

What is your ultimate meal? Delicious bread, salted butter, a dozen oysters, and a mezcal.

What three things are always in your pantry? Whole cardamom pods, canned smoked oysters, creamy peanut butter. (Not to be eaten together)

If you weren't a chef, what would you be? A geologist.

If you could cook with anyone, who would that be? If I could also bring back the dead, Julia Child.

Ovenly Salted Chocolate Chip Cookies (Secretly Vegan!)

Ingredients: 

2 cups (250 grams) all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon fine salt
1 1/4 cups dark chocolate chips (60 percent cocoa content or higher)
1/2 cup (100 grams) sugar
1/2 cup (110 grams) packed light or dark brown sugar (note: on photo shoot day, we used an especially dark vegan brown sugar)
1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon canola, grapeseed, or any other neutral oil
1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon water
Coarse-grained sea salt or flaky sea salt like Maldon, for garnish

Directions:

In a large bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Add the chocolate chips to the flour mixture and toss to coat.

In a separate large bowl, whisk the sugars briskly with the canola oil and water until smooth and incorporated, about 2 minutes. Note: Use fresh, soft light brown sugar. If there are clumps, break them up with the back of a spoon or your hand before whisking.

Add the flour mixture to the sugar mixture, and then stir with a wooden spoon or a rubber spatula until just combined and no flour is visible. Do not overmix.

Cover with plastic wrap. Refrigerate the dough for at least 12 hours and up to 24 hours. Do not skip this step!

Preheat the oven to 350° F. Line two rimmed sheet pans with parchment paper. Remove dough from the refrigerator and use a self-releasing ice cream scoop or a spoon to portion dough into 2-inch mound (let come to room temperature if too solid to scoop). We recommend freezing the balls of dough for 10 minutes before baking as the cookies will retain their shape better while baking.

Sprinkle the balls of dough with coarse-grained sea salt (if freezing, remove balls of dough from the freezer first), and bake for 12 to 13 minutes, or until the edges are just golden. Do not overbake.

Let cool completely before serving.