Shimano Yuu 350x350 - Shimano, Yuu

Yuu Shimano

Biography

Executive Chefs Yuu Shimano and Tomohiro Urata are the culinary masterminds behind the innovative menus at MIFUNE New York. The two chefs honed their skills while studying together at the Tsuji Culinary Institute in both Osaka, Japan and Lyon, France. Shimano went on to hold his first kitchen position at two Michelin-starred La Villa des Lys in Cannes and as Chef de Partie of Meats and Sauces at the eponymous three Michelin-starred Guy Savoy in Paris. While Urata worked in France as the Chef de Partie of Fish and Appetizers at two Michelin-starred La Relais de la Poste in Magescq, three Michelin-starred Régis & Jacques Marcon in Saint-Bonnet-le-Froid and three Michelin-starred Maison Troisgros in Roanne. The two then landed at MIFUNE New York, where they... READ MORE

Executive Chefs Yuu Shimano and Tomohiro Urata are the culinary masterminds behind the innovative menus at MIFUNE New York. The two chefs honed their skills while studying together at the Tsuji Culinary Institute in both Osaka, Japan and Lyon, France. Shimano went on to hold his first kitchen position at two Michelin-starred La Villa des Lys in Cannes and as Chef de Partie of Meats and Sauces at the eponymous three Michelin-starred Guy Savoy in Paris. While Urata worked in France as the Chef de Partie of Fish and Appetizers at two Michelin-starred La Relais de la Poste in Magescq, three Michelin-starred Régis & Jacques Marcon in Saint-Bonnet-le-Froid and three Michelin-starred Maison Troisgros in Roanne. The two then landed at MIFUNE New York, where they have become a dynamic team, captaining the kitchen to finely craft flavorful and ever-changing dishes, while always spotlighting the finest ingredients for the season.

Yuu Shimano studied at the Tsuji Culinary Institute in both Osaka, Japan and Lyon, France before securing his first kitchen position at two Michelin-starred La Villa des Lys at the Hotel Majestic in Cannes. Before coming to MIFUNE New York, Shimano was the Chef de Partie of Meats and Sauces at Guy Savoy’s eponymous three Michelin-starred restaurant in Paris.

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What is your favorite NYC restaurant? And what is your go-to dish? Chef’s Table at Brooklyn Fare is my favorite NYC restaurant. I can’t help but admire their depth of knowledge of cooking Japanese fish, and being able to watch them cook the dishes in front of you is also very exciting. They only offer a tasting menu, but if I could, I’d like to order their steamed Japanese Hirame dish again. The texture and the flavor was absolutely perfect. I believe they know how to cook this fish better than the Japanese themselves. What is your ultimate meal? Guy Savoy’s Meat Dishes. I’m sure there are a lot of different opinions as to what an ultimate meal is, but back when I was starting off as a chef, I figured the dishes at a 3-star Michelin restaurant in France were an ultimate meal of its own. I wanted to discover what that was, so I decided to work at Guy Savoy. Learning the sauces that accompany the meat dishes and the techniques to cook the meat served also gave me the confidence I needed as a chef at the time. Guy Savoy’s meat dishes are the most delicious to this day. His dishes continue to inspire me to create my own ultimate dishes. To me, Guy Savoy’s meat dishes are the most delicious dishes in the world. What three things are always in your pantry? One, a knife given to me by my Japanese chef friends. Before leaving for NYC, about 30 of my Japanese chef friends, who cook all over world, pitched in and got me a knife as a present. Every time I use it, it reminds me of them and their support. Two, a plate my friend, Shuji Hatanaga made for me. Shuji was born into a family that has a long history of making traditional tableware in Saga prefecture, Japan. When I was leaving Japan, he told me he wants to fight alongside me in New York and gave it to me. It's a plate I use for the most special of occasions. Whenever I use it, I feel like he’s got my back. Three, my passion for cooking. I wish to grow as a chef every day. Being a chef means working long hours and a lot of hard work, but whenever I present my best dish and the customers enjoy it, all that exhaustion goes away in an instant. To experience that moment again and in search of an even more satisfying moment like that, I continue to search for the best ingredients and the best way of cooking them to become an even better chef every day. If you weren't a chef, what would you be? A soccer player. When I was young, my passion was soccer. If you train hard, you get better and you can’t play soccer alone. I learned the importance of striving for something with your teammates towards a common goal. The things I experienced on and off the soccer field back then, still supports me to this day as a chef. If you could cook with anyone, who would that be? It would have to be Chef Cesar Ramirez or Chef Guy Savoy. Chef Cesar Ramirez is the chef I admire most in New York City. He came to MIFUNE and said he enjoyed my food. After his meal, my Sous Chef and I spoke to him at length and he told us, “I’m a Mexican chef, who cooks Japanese ingredients using French techniques, who is challenging myself in New York City.” He continued to say, “You guys, as Japanese chefs, who use French techniques and are carving your place in NYC, we are similar. You guys cook great food and that’s why you have this opportunity in NYC.” It was a wonderful feeling when Chef Cesar Ramirez told us he’d be cheering us on. It would be so exciting to be able to cook with him and be inspired by him. Chef Guy Savoy is my mentor. My foundation of French cuisine is based on what I personally learned from him. I’d like to cook with him again, so he can see how much I’ve grown as a chef. What’s your favorite NYCWFF memory? It’s an honor to be invited to take part in such a great festival. Since this is my first time participating, I look forward to making a lot of great memories and also, as a Japanese chef, it would make me happy if the festival go-ers can taste the “Japanese Quality” through my food.